When we fall, we rest

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Have you ever felt so lost that you could not feel your feet on the ground or could not see the sky above?

Have you ever felt so disconnected from yourself that you could not feel where you ended and others began?

Have you ever felt so turned off from your sacred centre that you could not feel your own heart beat?


Women's sensory nature is a vast landscape that has become distant to many of us so it is easy to get lost when we venture into our inner wild.

But when we have trust in our hearts, our reasons for our journey is never lost. When we stumble and fall into heart ache or loss, it is ok to sit down and stay put until we receive reassurance that the path is clear. In these moments, it is ok to doubt EVERYTHING as it is natural to feel overwhelmed by the immensity of the task that we have taken on.

If it is intergenerational trauma that we are trying to heal we may find that during times of personal struggle that we no longer know who we are anymore. We may reject our roles and responsibilities and slide into depression and apathy. This is our bodies way of telling us that we need to rest and tend to our vital life force.

When we are rested and restored, our bodies will venture forth into the wild again. 


In the story of Persephone, The Earth Mother, Demeter loses her vital life force, her daughter, who is seized by the God of the Underworld, Hades. All harvests stop as Demeter flies across the land searching mournfully for her daughter.

She raged, wept, begged and screamed to have what was lost restored. In her absolute pain she refuses to bestow her power upon the world and all living things begin to die as she herself fades from life.

Just when all hope felt lost, the Goddess Baubo finds Demeter and brings her back to life through laughter. Light begins to return to her body and she picks herself from the ground and begins her journey anew.

Soon enough Demeter and Persephone are reunited and the "world, the land, and the bellies of women are thrive again."

Jen Holden